Cathe, Jenn A, and Jenn D doing a Downward Facing Dog in the STS 2.0 Total Body Stretch recovery workout

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Pictured here are Cathe, Jenn A, and Jenn D doing a Downward Facing Dog in the STS 2.0 Total Body Stretch recovery workout.

Stretching, helps your muscles relax, which, in turn, accelerates the healing process due to the increased blood flow. You’ll be able to bounce back faster after an intense workout or a long day at work when you take the time to stretch for even just a few minutes.

Pre-Order Cathe's New STS 2.0: Muscle & Recovery Workout Program Now At: https://bit.ly/2WDfkdh and Get Free Worldwide Shipping!
 

ashaw

Cathlete
Yes!!! So true! I always remind myself to listen to my body and if I can’t lift as heavy as Cathe on a certain body part or do a HIIT move as fast as she does , it’s really ok because I’d rather be able to do the exercises, even if it’s modified than be sitting out because I tried to push beyond my limits and I injured myself.

i’m finally getting back to some “normal” cardio after injuring my knee during cardio slam back in June. I have a knee support brace that I wear and I’m slowly regaining my confidence but I still keep certain moves grounded. Im just now getting comfortable doing baby jumps and jumping jacks. Im being very cautious on the step and am at a point where if I only use one set of risers or no risers, that’s great because I’d rather play it safe, modify and still be able to exercise.
 

Hazlady

Cathlete
For down dog I have to be on my toes, and I also have to slightly bend my knees. If I try to do down dog like everyone else my back rounds, I can't send my hips up and back and I have too much weight on my hands which hurts my wrists. I had to go through this with my Pilates instructor to work out how to get into the best position for me.
 

Lady Vol Fan

Cathlete
Hazlady did they have elevate your hands on a surface so you weren't balancing your upper body on the floor or did they have you place your hands on yoga blocks to ease the strain on wrists?
 

Hazlady

Cathlete
Lady Vol Fan, I do use yoga blocks for some poses, and I also have a Pilates moon box which I sometimes use. But with down dog this is often a pose done as part of a flow or before transitioning into something else and I find I can't transition as easily using the blocks. I've also tried using Wrist Assured Gloves (WAGs) that raise the palm area of the hand, but this isn't enough for me with down dog, I still have to be on my toes and bend my knees. Another variation my instructor does with me is have looped ropes attached to a wall anchor which I step into and place up around my upper thigh/groin area. This helps support the weight of my hips and keeps them back, so I can get the full length through my back and arms with no strain on the wrists. I still have to have to be on my toes, but I can straighten my legs more. I can't transition into other poses when I use the ropes though.
 

Lady Vol Fan

Cathlete
Another variation my instructor does with me is have looped ropes attached to a wall anchor which I step into and place up around my upper thigh/groin area. This helps support the weight of my hips and keeps them back, so I can get the full length through my back and arms with no strain on the wrists.
What a great idea...thanks for sharing!

For jump squats I actually step into an anchored resistance band that rests in my hip crease so that it reduces the impact to knees. I still get some impact and I get the full cardio effect but never worry about twinges to my knees anymore.

Gotta do what we can to keep moving! :cool:
 

Hazlady

Cathlete
For me, finding ways to modify exercises is key to me continuing to work out. I can usually take modifications from other workouts I've done over the years but occasionally I need to get help from my Pilates instructor to come up with a suitable modification. She does a lot of rehab work with clients so she's really good at coming up with modifications.
 

Debinmi

Cathlete
What a great idea...thanks for sharing!

For jump squats I actually step into an anchored resistance band that rests in my hip crease so that it reduces the impact to knees. I still get some impact and I get the full cardio effect but never worry about twinges to my knees anymore.

Gotta do what we can to keep moving! :cool:
So where is the band anchored... at the upper level?
 

Lady Vol Fan

Cathlete
So where is the band anchored... at the upper level?
What works for me is it's attached at roughly shoulder height...I step thru and make sure to step away while it's resting at hip crease level ..I step away from the anchor just enough for the band to be fully extended but not pulled taut...I hope that makes sense?
 
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