TDEE question

exer_cited

Cathlete
Hi Cathe.

I just want to make sure I'm understanding this. I've struggled wth my weight all my life and need to know if I'm figuring this out correctly.

According to the Workout Manager, my TDEE is 1800 calories (apprx). If I eat 1400 calories daily, that gives me a 400 calorie deficit. And if I burn 700 calories doing The Viper for example (holy mackeral, btw), taking into account that I would have burned about 100 calories anyway, does that put me in a 1000 calorie deficit for the day?

That seems like a big deficit. Am I being counter-productive if my goal is to lose weight? I'm always baffled by my weight when I take into account how much I exercise and how much I eat. The formula seems so easy, but I still can't seem to get it right.

Thanks for your time!
 
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LaughingWater

Cathlete
I wonder how accurate our TDEEs are. For example, mine is 1852 with a BMR of 1347, but if I eat 1600 calories or more a day, I gain weight (and not the good, muscle-y kind of weight either).

At 1500, I maintain. At 1400, I start to lose. Less than 1400, and the weight comes off quickly, but I worry about taking in enough calories for weight training.

I want to build more muscle, but I don't want to gain fat. This week, I just started working out twice a day to jump start my metabolism (and perhaps lose 5+ pounds or so). I hope that helps, and I can avoid cutting more calories than necessary.

Here's hoping we find that perfect balance!
 

exer_cited

Cathlete
I think my TDEE is pretty close. I wore my HRM for 24 hours a few months back on a day that I didn't workout and I burned 1888 in 24 hours.
 

Bobbi-B

Cathlete
I'm wonder about the accuracty of estimating TDEE, even with electronic gadgets to help. I wear a Bodybugg, and according to it I burn about 1800 calories a day without exercise. For weeks (months?) I was eating 1700 calories per day and exercising to burn about 2200 per day on average. According to those figures, I should have been losing about a pound a week, but instead I just maintained my weight. It was frustrating because I felt like I was working hard and "deserved" to lose weight!

Finally I decided, time to accept things and figure out what to change. I dropped my calories to 1300 per day and started losing a pound a week, even though "on paper" it should have been closer to two pounds a week.

Of course, the margin of error could have come from my estimate of how many calories I eat, but I really try to be accurate, measure things, log everything, etc. At least I finally found what works for me, I'm fine with losing a pound a week, and when I get to my goal weight I'll know what to do to maintain it. HTH
 

LaughingWater

Cathlete
I question the accuracy too.

I think it's too easy for some of us to overestimate how many calories we need daily. How many here have been working out with Cathe for some time yet still carry extra weight? Why? Obviously that answer will be different for everyone, but a few of us may find we've just been eating too much.

To make things a tad more frustrating, we've all read how you shouldn't go below a certain number or you'll reset your metabolism at a lower number, you won't support your strength training (which revs up the metabolism), 5 meals a day vs 3 meals a day, too much cardio, too little cardio, protein vs carbs, etc. It's a little frustrating sometimes.

I've been experimenting for a little over two years with various numbers, calorie staggering, 5 meals vs 3, more protein, less protein, tracking every calorie...no matter how you slice it, 1600 calories does little more than pad my hips, and at 1500, nothing happens. At 1400, I lose weight and still make strength gains, but my arms remain stick-like. Grrr.
 

kellymom

Cathlete
I'm another who questions using the values given by the BMR and TDEE. I've actually had my BMR tested with machines and masks and the whole 9 yards and it said my BMR was 1400--but I don't lose weight unless I go below that and keep up my exercise. I wonder if the real problem is the information we are given about our food, not the scientific formulas.

I suspect that using food labels to count out 1400-1600 calories for the day is actually resulting in eating a higher calorie count, which is why I don't lose weight at levels the formulas say I'm "supposed to". I go ahead and set my limits lower figuring that the inaccurate calorie labels on food cause me to actually be closer to where I'm supposed to be eating to lose weight--and that's why I lose weight at those levels at the normal 1-2 lbs a week.
 

cataddict

Cathlete
I suspect that using food labels to count out 1400-1600 calories for the day is actually resulting in eating a higher calorie count, which is why I don't lose weight at levels the formulas say I'm "supposed to". I go ahead and set my limits lower figuring that the inaccurate calorie labels on food cause me to actually be closer to where I'm supposed to be eating to lose weight--and that's why I lose weight at those levels at the normal 1-2 lbs a week.

Kelly I think you've made a very good point about the calories and labels. I've read some research that shows the calorie count on the labels can be inaccurate by 20% and more. The numbers are at best an estimate.

I also think that it's better not to get caught up in isolating the numbers day by day. Maybe I'm in a calorie deficit one day, but not the next or the day after it. I don't think any of us has exactly the same routine each and every day. I think the numbers are a guideline rather than a hard and fast rule to live by.

I'd like to hear Cathe's take on this subject.
 

dixiedog6

Cathlete
I never really thought much about food lavels, 20 per cent is a large amount of calories over the long term.
 

JoanC

Cathlete
I wear my GoWearFit armband all the time. Since then if I accurately count my calories eaten I do lose a pound if the deficit is 3500 calories for the week. Guaranteed. However I can only eat 1450 calories average per day. I just don't use as many calories as they estimate on dvd. You need to add sedentary calories and actual exercise calories burned. If you have already set calculations for slightly or moderately active it already accounts for the exercise you do and you can't add it to total.

For me to stay on the 1450 calories average the easiest I eat 1150-1250 calories for 3 days and on the 4th day eat 1500-1900 calories so that the average is 1450 per day for the week. This is using the technique of Burn the Fat Feed the Muscle.
 

Pcramer

Cathlete
I suspect that using food labels to count out 1400-1600 calories for the day is actually resulting in eating a higher calorie count, which is why I don't lose weight at levels the formulas say I'm "supposed to". I go ahead and set my limits lower figuring that the inaccurate calorie labels on food cause me to actually be closer to where I'm supposed to be eating to lose weight--and that's why I lose weight at those levels at the normal 1-2 lbs a week.


Such a good point and I think you are correct about the food labels being off, which is why I have been struggling so long trying to loose weight at my "magic number" and haven't been able to :mad: I am going to adjust for a 20% error in the food labels, which is about 300 calories :confused: for me and see how that works for a while.
 

Dela

Cathlete
I watched a video once, I think it was in an email from Tom Venuto about how a label may say for example half a cup of oatmeal is 150 calories, but if you actually scoop out a full 1/2 cup it's much more than the 150, that the actual amount to equal 150 is a very scant 1/2 cup, not a level 1/2 cup. They suggested you weigh your food on a scale instead of measuring cups to ensure the calories are more accurate. This does not of course address the labels that just lie altogether about calorie counts.
 

Pcramer

Cathlete
Thanks Dela!!

I know when a measure out any food type I take to the very tippy top of the measuring cup :p and doing myself more harm than good. Looks like I need to make some adjustments in that aspect too.
 

Dela

Cathlete
Thanks Dela!!

I know when a measure out any food type I take to the very tippy top of the measuring cup :p and doing myself more harm than good. Looks like I need to make some adjustments in that aspect too.

I never would have thought that when they said 1/2 cup, it did not mean a level half cup, that's a little sneaky!
 

meliffy18

Cathlete
Such a good point and I think you are correct about the food labels being off, which is why I have been struggling so long trying to loose weight at my "magic number" and haven't been able to :mad: I am going to adjust for a 20% error in the food labels, which is about 300 calories :confused: for me and see how that works for a while.

Maybe this is my problem???? I am going to try to reduce by 20% too. That could be pretty helpful. Thanks!!
 

Sherri C.

Cathlete
Melissa,

You said that a 1,000 calorie deficit seems like a big deficit, and I just wanted to mention that I've heard there are 3,000 calories in one pound, so if you are creating a 1,000 calorie deficit, you would lose about 2 pounds a week, which sounds logical if you only eat 1,400 calories and exercise.
 

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