Exercises to change baby's position?

RebeccaK

Member
Hello. I am almost in my 35th week of pregnancy and last week I had an ultrasound and found that my baby is lying in the transverse (sideways) position. I was wondering if you know of any exercises or stretches that could help to move my baby into the right position? I've heard crawling around on my hands and knees might work - is this true?? Also, when I do my step workouts, there are alot of moves where my arms are over my head. I remember hearing once that if you stretch your arms over you head you could get the baby wrapped up in the umb. cord. Is there any truth to this at all? Thank you for any advice!
 
Re: Changing baby's position

I know of no "scientifically based" exercises that will turn your baby from a transverse to a head-down position . There is a procedure called an "external version" that is tried with women who have breech babies. I am not sure if it might work with a transverse. You might want to ask your doctor what your options are.

Don't worry about the cord getting wrapped around the baby's neck if you put your arms overhead. That is definitely an old wives' tale. Not to worry. Keep on stepping!

Keep in touch. Let me know if that baby turns for you. Good luck. You are almost there!
 
S

susan p

Guest
some questions

Rebecca, I'm curious about what your doc is going to do. . . Has he said anything about attempting an external version or the possibility of a C-section? My third was a very stubborn little breech girl, we tried external version and it didn't work (although in general my doc has great luck with it) and I did end up having a C-section (which, I discovered, is really NOT the end of the world!). I guess I'm just curious. -susan p
 

clindsay

Member
My daughter turned herself......

My daughter was transverse. I declined the external version because everyone I know who has had it done said a) it was excruciatingly painful and b) it didn't work for any of them. When I went in pre-op, she had turned around by herself, so they sent me home! My doctor said that he had this happen to another patient too. Also, if memory serves, VF WWWendy's baby was transverse, and he turned himself too. Also, one of my friends whose second child was breech said that recovering from her 'c' was *much* easier than recovering from the birth of her first child. Good luck!
 

RebeccaK

Member
External Version?

What exactly is an external version? Is that when the doctor manuelly tries to move the baby? For anyone that has experienced this, is it terribly painful? My ultrasound tech said this could be an option for me. She also said that by 32 weeks the baby is usually in the position its going to be in for birth so it makes me feel better to hear stories of babies moving into the vertex position right before birth. At least its a possibility. I'm not sure what my dr. is going to suggest because I haven't seen him since the ultrasound. I'll find out next week.
 
S

susan p

Guest
external version

Rebecca, my doc has about a 70% success rate with external version, which is higher than the average of 50%. During an external version they put fetal monitor on you and set up an ultrasound. Then the doc literally tries to shove the baby around in there from the outside of your tummy! It IS quite painful, but labor breathing helps a lot. They will usually only push for 60 to 90 seconds at a time, then they take a rest, then try again, and usually they give up after 3 tries. I guess the reason I don't call it "excruciating" (as I have heard a lot of women describe it) is that I figure I can handle 60 to 90 seconds of about anything! Knowing the time would be limited, as well as using labor breathing, made it bearable. If it spares you from a C-section, its worth it. Depends on your personal doc's skill and experience with versions. I can't agree with the woman whose friend said recovering from her C-section was easier than a vaginal birth. I had two vaginals before my C and in my experience neither one is easy. Just a choice of where you stitches are, either way you've got stitches to heal and a recovery to go through! I'd say vaginal is significantly easier to recover from. -susan p
 

Kristin Aziz

Cathlete
External versions and C-sections

My son was breech as well (my first pregnancy). My doc attempted an ECV (external cephalic version) at 37 weeks as well. Yes, it was painful (but short), and no, it didn't work. My son was already engaged in the pelvis and just didn't want to move!
Basically, it is the most uncomfortable when it doesn't work, because the doctor will keep up with the procedure. When version works, it usually works fairly easily. My experience recovering from my C-section was similar to Susan's. A C-section is major abdominal surgery, which we tend to forget. It's not something to approach lightly. However, when it's medically indicated, the risks are definitely outweighed by the benefits. I was much more tired after my C-section than I was after my VBAC (I labored and delivered vaginally with my second child). The amount of discomfort I had postpartum, while not excruciating by any means after my C-section, was definitely less after my vaginal birth. But every woman's experience is different; I have spoken with some women who have had very difficult recoveries from vaginal births (most do not). Oh, forgot to mention--if a baby is in any position other than vertex (head down) at 32-36 weeks, it is not unusual for them to turn. If a baby is vertex at 32 weeks, they usually stay that way. Good luck!

Kristin
 

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