Anyone do "Dry Brushing"?

Gobias

Cathlete
I have heard of dry brushing for a few years now and it always interested me, but I never tried it. I finally had a massage where the therapist dry brushed me and I really liked it.

Anyone have experience? Any tips on what kind of brush to get (for me to do it to myself, so I need to reach my back), or what kind of brush not to get. Do you do this daily? Do you notice any benefits?

Thanks!
 

~Elsie

Cathlete
Hey, yeah I learned how to dry brush many years ago when I was working in the spa industry. I would say I do it now about every 4-5 days (that is what I aim for) or when my limbs feel sluggish. I tend to get edema in my lower body and more on one side. It is a good idea to follow the meridian lines of your body & move the brush towards the direction of your heart. These are the basic guidelines. Of course, you can always just brush anyway you like for the exfoliating benefit, but for circulation, lymph movement etc. benefits, it's a good idea to follow your lymphatic "paths". Give good attention to the clavicle area. The time NOT to dry brush or any direct lymphatic stimulation (body rolling etc.) is when you have the flu or are sick.
Any brush that you find a little firm but comfortable I think ought to work. If you have stronger/thicker skin, you could try something a little rougher perhaps. I know some people who enjoy the firmer coconut ones, but I prefer those just for my feet! I just have a cheapish one that I knew didn't use animals (boar, horse) which I bought at Winners (in USA TJ Maxx) which works nicely. Bürstenhaus is a premium brand that many spas use, if that's your style.

I also started doing gua sha/scraping the past couple of years which is the same basic idea. For me, the benefits are stronger.





Please post how you get on with it!!
:)
 

Nanbo

Cathlete
Hey, yeah I learned how to dry brush many years ago when I was working in the spa industry. I would say I do it now about every 4-5 days (that is what I aim for) or when my limbs feel sluggish. I tend to get edema in my lower body and more on one side. It is a good idea to follow the meridian lines of your body & move the brush towards the direction of your heart. These are the basic guidelines. Of course, you can always just brush anyway you like for the exfoliating benefit, but for circulation, lymph movement etc. benefits, it's a good idea to follow your lymphatic "paths". Give good attention to the clavicle area. The time NOT to dry brush or any direct lymphatic stimulation (body rolling etc.) is when you have the flu or are sick.
Any brush that you find a little firm but comfortable I think ought to work. If you have stronger/thicker skin, you could try something a little rougher perhaps. I know some people who enjoy the firmer coconut ones, but I prefer those just for my feet! I just have a cheapish one that I knew didn't use animals (boar, horse) which I bought at Winners (in USA TJ Maxx) which works nicely. Bürstenhaus is a premium brand that many spas use, if that's your style.

I also started doing gua sha/scraping the past couple of years which is the same basic idea. For me, the benefits are stronger.





Please post how you get on with it!!
:)
Wow, Elsie, this is great information! I have a dry brush and was never really sure which direction to stroke. Your diagrams are very helpful. Thanks!
 

Gobias

Cathlete
Thanks, Elsie for the thorough info! I mainly want to do the dry brushing for lymphatic support and circulation. I heard to brush towards your heart (anything below the heart brush up, anything above the heart brush down), but your diagram makes me wonder - what is the diagram showing? Am I to start where the bigger black dots are and brush in the direction of the protruding lines? In that case I would be brushing out like a "starburst" from each bigger black dot, and not necessarily towards the heart.

Also, can you elaborate on the collarbone area? I had assumed you would brush down towards your heart, but now am thinking I brush in a circle motion? I just want all the lymphatic benefits I can get.

I did find 2 brushes I am thinking of getting, thanks for pointing out the different materials of the brush.

Now on to scraping...I had seen this about 6 months ago and I was very intrigued and then just must have forgotten about it. Is this something you can do on your own? I think I would benefit from my back/neck being done and therefore would need someone else to do it for me. The thing that scared me was I am pretty pale and already mark up quickly. I am just afraid I will look like a giant hickey or even scar. Does the skin break open or does the redness come from underneath the skin and there aren't any actual scratches/openings/breakage of the skin? How long does it take to heal? Thinking way way back to my High School days of having to wear turtle necks after a weekend date, I think I took about a week to heal. What benefits have you seen from scraping? Pain decrease or lymphatic drainage?

Thanks
 

~Elsie

Cathlete
I heard to brush towards your heart (anything below the heart brush up, anything above the heart brush down), but your diagram makes me wonder - what is the diagram showing?
Also, can you elaborate on the collarbone area? I had assumed you would brush down towards your heart
Yes, Gobias, absolutely start with brushing towards the heart center. That is correct! (from how I was trained anyway). The diagram is pointing out the lymphatic centers & you can stimulate these as well and move in the direction shown, especially if you would like a more pronounced effect I guess. But begin with moving towards the heart. That is mostly what I do anyway.
Yes, I mentioned the collarbone from a beauty perspective (I am not a clinician of any sort and was trained at a spa) as stimulating this area really seems to help with any swelling in the face. It (in most women I have seen, not all) can reduce the look of the jowl or pre-jowl area and those marionette folds. Move from the neck down towards the clavicle area. Both straight downwards and diagonally I find works best.

I have just recently began to get more serious with the scraping. I do it for fatigue (I have some auto-immune issues) and mostly circulation/movement. It definitely works!! It can cause a little bruising (I am quite pale), but it does not puncture skin. It shouldn't anyway. I use a porcelain gua sha tool that I bought here in a Japanese store. I think there are "scratchier" tools that can be used which might leave marks. Sorry if my posting was a little confusing/all over the place. I do tend to sometimes get excited about a subject I like & then tangent a lot. I am working on that!! ;) It will not leave a hickey on you skin like cupping. Have you had cupping?
 

Gobias

Cathlete
I am the OP and have been dry brushing now for a few days. I love it! I got two brushes and am glad I did. The more firm bristles left scratches all over me even though I brushed lightly. I healed within a day, but the next day I used the firm bristles on my legs and the softer bristles everywhere else and didn't have as many scratches (I have to press lighter for my skin from now on). I feel all prickly afterwards.

Question: what do you clean the brushes with? My brushes say not to get them wet and I was planning on using mild soap/water. Do you just spritz them with E.O.? I want to be careful with whatever I use to clean them since it will then be transferred onto my skin. I was thinking spritzing with Tea Tree Oil?

Thanks to those who answered my questions and gave extra info. Elsie - I am trying to find a scraping therapist near me with some good feedback. I had previously seen online pics of people all red where it looked like the skin was broken and it just terrified me since I mark up very easily. Also, do you dry brush your face? I like your thoughts on dry brushing that area for beauty.
 

~Elsie

Cathlete
Gobias, sounds like you are having a lot of fun with experimenting with dry brushing! :) I would generally advise (and will look forward to see what other tips we may get in this thread) to keep them out of your steamy washroom as often as possible as that's the environment in our homes with the most yeast, bacteria etc. I use the same type of solution of use to wipe my yoga mat : Spritz bottle of 65% white vinegar, 35% water, 3 squirts of liquid castile soap and a yeast inhibiting EO like oregano (very little). I personally think an undiluted eo might be too strong, although with the directions of not getting them wet at all, I guess you might want to try it. The absolute most effective cleaning solution is direct sun for 30 minutes (like how folks cleaned their wool in the olden days), but of course that isn't always an option.
I tried some dry brushing on my face although I didn't stick to it as the bristles were always too rough on my very delicate skin (I get noticable broken capillaries from little pressure there) . I have noticed though that Aveda has introduced a brush specifically for the face and I might just try it out!!
As for the scraping, sometimes I think Chinese and Vietnamese practitioners might just go a little easier on us who are perhaps not familiar with it which might have been the case with me! lol. I know with cupping I have told my practitioner to use as much pressure as possible.
 

bpcw

Cathlete
What useful tips!
I dry-brush once or twice a week using German mitts I bought through the lady who started Facercise (Carole Maggio). She owns a salon/spa in Southern Calif (and does online orders). She also originated a No-Lipo Lipo kneading method that makes me brush and/or moisturize harder.:p
But I too do it for lympathic and circulation reasons. I've been dry-brushing since last summer but haven't noticed any physical changes but will continue since I know it's very good for me.
I really don't know how to clean them but having read Elsie's post I must take them out of the bathroom! When the hot weather comes, I'll hang them in the sun.
 

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