low pulse rate question

aycaramba

Active Member
So I had my annual physical examination and heart rate was at 124/77, but had a low pulse rate of 44. MY primary care thought that was rather low and gave me a referral to see a cardiologyest. Lets keep in my that I work out 6 days a week and have been for the past 20+years. I'm experiencing anxiety attacks because of this issue. Should't she had order blood work first before sending me to see a cardiologyst? I always thought that having a low heart rate pulse was good? please advice. Thank you!
 

ChelePA

Cathlete
I too have a low pulse—bradycardia. Also referred to a cardiologist many years ago. They ended up doing a sleep study to make sure it wasn’t dropping too low at night and not getting enough oxygen. During sleep, it dropped even lower but all readings were good. Being in good shape gives you a lower pulse. Any other symptoms? Probably just a precaution. Good luck!
 

112toGuru

Cathlete
Can be good. I track mine but not as closely as I used to. Sometimes a real drop would indicate overtraining, but you wouldn't know that if you don't track it all the time. Better to check it out, nothing to be anxious about. You have been active regularly for years, and your blood pressure is okay, although now they have changed the normal to under 120/80 I believe. It's always a little higher at the office. 44 bpm is pretty low, but not for an endurance athlete.
 

Nanbo

Cathlete
Don't let this scare you! My DH was a pro athlete and had a very low resting heart rate (around 33). During a routine mandatory work related physical an idiot doctor wanted to crack him open for exploratory surgery after an ECG showed what the doctor thought was a weird interval. My DH gave a detailed medical/sports history but this fool wouldn't accept it (even though my DH was a lean ripped gorgeous specimen ;)!). After being bounced around the cardiology department for a few hours someone thought it might be a good idea to do a little research. Turns out this is very normal for elite athletes...sounds like you may fit into this category. Many doctors nowadays are "flow chart diagnosticians" and aren't very knowledgeable about people in athletic condition. Find a good sports medicine specialist!
 

DirtDiva

Cathlete
Don't let this scare you! My DH was a pro athlete and had a very low resting heart rate (around 33). During a routine mandatory work related physical an idiot doctor wanted to crack him open for exploratory surgery after an ECG showed what the doctor thought was a weird interval. My DH gave a detailed medical/sports history but this fool wouldn't accept it (even though my DH was a lean ripped gorgeous specimen ;)!). After being bounced around the cardiology department for a few hours someone thought it might be a good idea to do a little research. Turns out this is very normal for elite athletes...sounds like you may fit into this category. Many doctors nowadays are "flow chart diagnosticians" and aren't very knowledgeable about people in athletic condition. Find a good sports medicine specialist!
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This is so typical, its why they call it a practice. I don't like villifying the medical community, but they nearly cost the life of my newborn son and then myself when I was in my 30's. My dad died from exploratory surgery. My uncle died from exploratory surgery and a prescription of Lyrica. I do not trust doctors which are unfortunately handcuffed to the sick-care industry which is managed by our behemoth insurance industry. I have never once regretted one dollar I've spent on workout gear, my bikes, my carefully vetted supplements and health care items such as my sauna, teeter, reformer, etc. Over the years, I've realized due to certain unfortunate situations, I didn't have health insurance like my friends. They pitied me. But when I look around, those that do have insurance and go to the doctor for vacinations, and prescriptions and antibiotics, they remain sick, and become weaker. I'm not saying this for acute illness, tramautic injuries or anything involving children (lets be logical here) ... I'm talking about us ... as mature adults. I'm pretty much the only person in my circle that doesn't have a prescription, refuses mammograms, bone scans, this shot, that shot. Can't do it anyway, no insurance... good. I weirdly enough enjoy my life with a purpose, and thankfully I'm not a sheep. I digress, for the most part people should not be scared by their doctors, instead...research like your life depends on it. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/ is a great place to get honest info instead of the pharmaceutical owned sites such as Webmd and Medline, etc. Stick to your convictions, and listen to that wonderful antenna we have been told to ignore.
 

workout

Cathlete
Don't let this scare you! My DH was a pro athlete and had a very low resting heart rate (around 33). During a routine mandatory work related physical an idiot doctor wanted to crack him open for exploratory surgery after an ECG showed what the doctor thought was a weird interval. My DH gave a detailed medical/sports history but this fool wouldn't accept it (even though my DH was a lean ripped gorgeous specimen ;)!). After being bounced around the cardiology department for a few hours someone thought it might be a good idea to do a little research. Turns out this is very normal for elite athletes...sounds like you may fit into this category. Many doctors nowadays are "flow chart diagnosticians" and aren't very knowledgeable about people in athletic condition. Find a good sports medicine specialist!

Nando, I read your post about that doctor wanting to do surgery on your husband - that's crazy. Even after giving the doctor your husband's medical/sports history he would just not listen. There are some idiot doctors out there. Glad he didn't have that useless surgery that would've put your husband out for weeks recuperating!
 

Hazlady

Cathlete
When you exercise regularly and focus on good form you develop body awareness. Listen to your body. If you are maintaining a good exercise regime and your results are good then your pulse rate is probably just normal for you. Also you need to be aware that some of the numbers that doctors work to have been set by the pharmaceutical companies in order to sell more drugs. Test readings that are deemed high or low today may have been normal 20 or 30 years ago but the pharmaceutical companies have adjusted the limits of what is considered normal.
 

aycaramba

Active Member
Thank you all so much for your words of encouragement!! I knew I could always count on Catheletes to make me feel better!
 

aycaramba

Active Member
So ended up going to see a cardiologist about my low pulse rate and he congratulated me for my low pulse. However because both my mom and older brother suffered heart attacks, mom survived both brother was not so lucky-second one killed him at the age of 48. He did order a stress test and echocardiogram because of family history. I'm curious to know if anyone has had this forum has had this procedures done and how much did it cost and if insurance covered any? Thank you!
 
My resting HR is usually around 41-45. My doctor also thought it was too low but like you, I workout 5 days a week and do high intensity cardio and was running three days a week. I think it's safe to say our hearts are very healthy and strong. But it's always good to get it checked out if you are concerned. If that is how it's always been, I say just let it go.

I've had a stress test done years ago and also the doctor made me wear a monitor to read my HR so they could study the pattern. Turned out at the time I was having anxiety issues, but they went away and I've been good ever since. This was like 15 years ago. My insurance covered 80% of the procedure and I had to pay my co-pay plus 20%. I don't remember it being too bad to pay. Oh, and I had an EKG as well. The tests aren't bad, just time consuming. I hated wearing that monitor.
 
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Lucia A

Cathlete
When I was 26 yrs old I averaged 90 over 60 Blood Pressure and 46 resting heart rate. Since I was in the AFROTC my doc decided to test my BP 3x a day, in 3 different positions standing/sitting/lie down for 5 days in a row. It was always the same.... normal for me.
 

TCB309

Cathlete
My husband's stress test was covered by insurance, he had weird heart rhythms, turned out to just be the way he is wired (after several more tests). Apparently abnormal can be normal. We had a copay of $100, however, every insurance is different.

I had a sleep test done because my resting heart rate was in the 40s and my fitbit kept showing 25 when I was sleeping. They didn't want to stress test me because of that but kept saying the fitbit was wrong. With their fancy equipment they found my heart rate was going all the way to 20 and sometimes 18 while I was sleeping. Mine turned out to be a thyroid condition, which is hereditary in my family. My labs just didn't show it because apparently being active can make the thyroid numbers seem fine, even when it's failing. I had off the chart thyroid antibodies and several nodules. Now that I'm on thyroid meds my rhr is in the 60's and doesn't go below 35 when I sleep.

I hope your stress test goes well!
 
I also had a heart rate of 40 / 41. I wore a heart rate monitor for awhile and all came back fine. It was just labeled bradycardia as well due to fitness.. Hope everything goes well for you:)
 

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